Timothy J. Strauman

Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience

Education & Training

  • Ph.D., New York University 1987

  • M.A., University of Chicago 1979

  • B.A., Duquesne University 1978

Overview

Professor Strauman's research focuses on the psychological and neurobiological processes that enable self-regulation, conceptualized in terms of a cognitive/motivational perspective, as well as the relation between self-regulation and affect. Particular areas of emphasis include: (1) conceptualizing self-regulation in terms of brain/behavior motivational systems; (2) the role of self-regulatory cognitive processes in vulnerability to depression and other disorders; (3) the impact of treatments for depression, such as psychotherapy and medication, on self-regulatory function and dysfunction in depression; (4) how normative and non-normative socialization patterns influence the development of self-regulatory systems; (5) the contributory roles of self-regulation, affect, and psychopathology in determining immunologically-mediated susceptibility to illness; (6) development of novel multi-component treatments for depression targeting self-regulatory dysfunction; (7) utilization of brain imaging techniques to test hypotheses concerning self-regulation, including the nature and function of hypothetical regulatory systems and characterizing the breakdowns in self-regulation that lead to and accompany depression.

Expertise

Self-regulation, depression, translational research

Strauman, TJ, Goetz, EL, Detloff, AM, MacDuffie, KE, Zaunmuller, L, and Lutz, W. "Self-regulation and psychotherapy: A theory-based translational perspective." Journal of Personality (2012). (Academic Article)

Strauman, TJ, Detloff, AM, Sestokas, R, Smith, DV, Goetz, EL, Rivera, C, and Kwapil, L. "What shall I be, what must I be: neural correlates of personal goal activation. (Published online)" Front Integr Neurosci 6 (2012): 123-. Full Text Open Access Copy

Goetz, EL, Hariri, AR, Pizzagalli, DA, and Strauman, TJ. "Genetic moderation of the association between regulatory focus and reward responsiveness." Biology of Mood and Anxiety Disorders (2012). (Academic Article) Open Access Copy

Klenk, MM, Strauman, TJ, and Higgins, ET. "Regulatory Focus and Anxiety: A Self-Regulatory Model of GAD-Depression Comorbidity." Pers Individ Dif 50.7 (May 1, 2011): 935-943. Open Access Copy

Ritchey, M, Dolcos, F, Eddington, KM, Strauman, TJ, and Cabeza, R. "Neural correlates of emotional processing in depression: changes with cognitive behavioral therapy and predictors of treatment response." J Psychiatr Res 45.5 (May 2011): 577-587. Full Text Open Access Copy

Burk, LR, Armstrong, JM, Goldsmith, HH, Klein, MH, Strauman, TJ, Costanzo, P, and Essex, MJ. "Sex, temperament, and family context: how the interaction of early factors differentially predict adolescent alcohol use and are mediated by proximal adolescent factors." Psychol Addict Behav 25.1 (March 2011): 1-15. Full Text Open Access Copy

Brown, LH, Strauman, T, Barrantes-Vidal, N, Silvia, PJ, and Kwapil, TR. "An experience-sampling study of depressive symptoms and their social context." Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease 199.6 (2011): 403-409. Full Text Open Access Copy

Smith, PJ, Blumenthal, JA, Babyak, MA, Craighead, L, Welsh-Bohmer, KA, Browndyke, JN, Strauman, TA, and Sherwood, A. "Effects of the dietary approaches to stop hypertension diet, exercise, and caloric restriction on neurocognition in overweight adults with high blood pressure." Hypertension 55.6 (June 2010): 1331-1338. Full Text Open Access Copy

Smith, PJ, Blumenthal, JA, Hoffman, BM, Cooper, H, Strauman, TA, Welsh-Bohmer, K, Browndyke, JN, and Sherwood, A. "Aerobic exercise and neurocognitive performance: a meta-analytic review of randomized controlled trials." Psychosom Med 72.3 (April 2010): 239-252. (Review) Full Text Open Access Copy

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