Timothy J. Strauman

Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience

Education & Training

  • Ph.D., New York University 1987

  • M.A., University of Chicago 1979

  • B.A., Duquesne University 1978

Overview

Professor Strauman's research focuses on the psychological and neurobiological processes that enable self-regulation, conceptualized in terms of a cognitive/motivational perspective, as well as the relation between self-regulation and affect. Particular areas of emphasis include: (1) conceptualizing self-regulation in terms of brain/behavior motivational systems; (2) the role of self-regulatory cognitive processes in vulnerability to depression and other disorders; (3) the impact of treatments for depression, such as psychotherapy and medication, on self-regulatory function and dysfunction in depression; (4) how normative and non-normative socialization patterns influence the development of self-regulatory systems; (5) the contributory roles of self-regulation, affect, and psychopathology in determining immunologically-mediated susceptibility to illness; (6) development of novel multi-component treatments for depression targeting self-regulatory dysfunction; (7) utilization of brain imaging techniques to test hypotheses concerning self-regulation, including the nature and function of hypothetical regulatory systems and characterizing the breakdowns in self-regulation that lead to and accompany depression.

Expertise

Self-regulation, depression, translational research

Strauman, TJ. "Self pathology from a self-regulation perspective." Journal of Psychotherapy Integration 5 (1995): 313-321. (Academic Article)

STRAUMAN, TJ. "SELF-REPRESENTATIONS AND THE NATURE OF COGNITIVE CHANGE IN PSYCHOTHERAPY." JOURNAL OF PSYCHOTHERAPY INTEGRATION 4.4 (December 1994): 291-316.

Strauman, TJ, and Glenberg, AM. "Self-concept and body-image disturbance: Which self-beliefs predict body size overestimation?." Cognitive Therapy and Research 18.2 (1994): 105-125. Full Text

Newman, JP, Wallace, JF, Strauman, TJ, Skolaski, RL, Oreland, KM, Mattek, PW, Elder, KA, and McNeely, J. "Effects of motivationally significant stimuli on the regulation of dominant responses." J Pers Soc Psychol 65.1 (July 1993): 165-175.

Strauman, TJ, Lemieux, AM, and Coe, CL. "Self-discrepancy and natural killer cell activity: immunological consequences of negative self-evaluation." J Pers Soc Psychol 64.6 (June 1993): 1042-1052.

Cudeck, R, Chaplin, W, Harlow, L, LaDu, TJ, Panter, AT, and Strauman, TJ. "Tanaka, Jeffrey S. – 1958-1992." Multivariate Behavioral Research 28 (1993): 161-170. (Academic Article)

Levin, AP, Saoud, JB, Strauman, TJ, Gorman, JM, Fyer, AJ, Crawford, R, and Liebowitz, MR. "Responses of "generalized" and "discrete" social phobics during public speaking." Journal of Anxiety Disorders 5 (1993): 224-236. (Academic Article)

Strauman, TJ, Lemieux, A, and Coe, C. "Self-discrepancies and natural killer cell activity: The influence of individual differences in self-regulation on stress physiology." Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 64 (1993): 1042-1052. (Academic Article)

Levin, AP, Saoud, JB, Strauman, T, Gorman, JM, Fyer, AJ, Crawford, R, and Liebowitz, MR. "Responses of "generalized" and "discrete" social phobics during public speaking." Journal of Anxiety Disorders 7.3 (1993): 207-221.

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