Michael A. Wallach
  • Michael A. Wallach

  • Professor Emeritus of Psychological and Brain Sciences
  • Psychology and Neuroscience
  • 320 Soc-psych, Durham, NC 27708
  • Phone: (919) 660-5741
  • Fax: (919) 660-5726
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Overview

    Michael A. Wallach received his B.A. from Swarthmore College in 1954, and he received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1958. His doctoral dissertation was on categorizing and conceptualization. He taught at Harvard University, MIT, and the University of Chicago. He has also served for ten years (1963-1972) as Editor of the Journal of Personality. He was for 20 years (1989-2008) Editor of a book series on Alternatives in Psychology, published by State University of New York Press. Dr. Wallach's research spans a wide range of topics. His books and articles cover such areas as personality, social psychology, and cognitive processes. In recent years his research has focused on the learning processes of gifted and disadvantaged children. His recent research has also concerned the value implications of psychology for defining goals of human conduct. He has also recently pursued work on egoism, altruism, and ethics; on mental patients, institutions, and homelessness; and on processes of knowing in psychology--experimentation that does and does not contribute to psychological knowledge. His current work concerns varying conceptions of mind.
  • Research Summary

    Learning--Gifted & Disadvantaged Children, Values
  • Education

      • Ph.D.,
      • Harvard University,
      • 1958
  • Awards, Honors and Distinctions

      • Seven Views of Mind Outstanding Title,
      • Choice,
      • January, 2014
  • Recent Publications

      • L Wallach and MA Wallach.
      • 2012.
      • Seven views of mind.
      • New York:
      • Psychology Press/ Taylor and Francis.
      • 1-116 p.
      Publication Description

      © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.This book examines seven different answers to the question, “What are we talking about when we talk about the mind?” It begins by considering the dualistic view, frequently taken for granted by students, that words like “belief,” “anger,” and “jealousy” refer to a realm quite distinct from the physical world, and notes the difficulties associated with this view as well as why many find it compelling. The book then describes six further major views of mind alternative to dualism that have been developed by psychologists, philosophers, and neuroscientists: Some claim that such words are just about behavior. Some claim that such words are theoretical constructs, like “quarks“ in physics. Some identify the mind with the brain or with a kind of program in the brain like the software in a computer. Some think there is nothing to which such words refer. Some think mental talk reflects nothing but convention.Students in psychology learn about different views of mind in various courses, but they tend to be left on their own to deal with the conflicts among them. How to conceive of mind is usually addressed in the context not of psychology but of philosophy, where it tends to be treated in ways that may seem esoteric to psychology students. Seldom discussed in one place, this book presents all seven views and the reasons for and against each in a relatively nontechnical, informal manner designed to appeal to psychology students and their instructors, permitting comparisons and possible resolutions.

      • L Wallach and MA Wallach.
      • 2010.
      • Some Theories are Unfalsifiable A Comment on Trafimow.
      • THEORY & PSYCHOLOGY
      • 20:
      • 703-706
      • .
      • RE Drake, EL O'Neal and MA Wallach.
      • 2008.
      • A systematic review of psychosocial research on psychosocial interventions for people with co-occurring severe mental and substance use disorders.
      • JOURNAL OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT
      • 34:
      • 123-138
      • .
      • RE Drake and MA Wallach.
      • 2008.
      • Conceptual models of treatment for co-occuring substance use.
      • Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis
      • 1:
      • 189-193
      • .
      • RE Drake and MA Wallach.
      • 2007.
      • Is comorbidity a psychological science?.
      • CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY-SCIENCE AND PRACTICE
      • 14:
      • 20-22
      • .
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