• Publications of Owen Flanagan

      • Journal Articles

          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2013.
          • The Social Epistemological Normalization of Contestable Narratives:* Stories of Just Deserts.
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2013.
          • The View From the East Pole: Buddhist and Confucian Tolerance.
          • .
          Publication Description

          In this chapter I ask the question: Why are Buddhists and Confucians more tolerant, less conflict prone, less war-like, etc. than Abrahamic peoples IF THEY ARE?1 A proper analysis that positioned us to adequately answer this question would require defining the different concepts—“tolerance,” “conflict-prone,” “war-like”—producing evidence that it is true that there exist significant differences between adherents of these different traditions, and then using something like Mill’s methods to rule out political, economic, or material culture explanations of the differences, thereby making the reli- gious differences the most plausible candidate for the difference-maker.2 Here I do something less than what is needed. I operate on the assump- tion that it is true that Buddhists and Confucians are more tolerant, less conflict-prone, etc. than Abrahamic people, all else equal.3 Then I formulate a hypothesis for why the difference-maker may have to do with God, or better, with beliefs about God’s nature and modus operandi. I say “may” because I am not convinced that my hypothesis is true. The hypothesis is not that Buddhism and Confucianism are more rational, less superstitious than the Abrahamic religions. It is that Buddhism and Confucianism have theologies that differ from the Abrahamic ones in ways that make a difference. The core idea is that the belief in the Abrahamic God (Yahweh, God, Allah) engenders or supports attitudes and actions that demand epistemic and normative conformity across peoples with different customs, habits, and beliefs. Buddhist and Confucian theologies differ from each other in important ways, but share the following two features (Flanagan 2008; Flanagan 2011):

          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2013.
          • Identity and Addiction: What Alcoholic Memoirs Teach.
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr. & Stephen Martin.
          • 2012.
          • Science and the Modest Image of Epistemology.
          • Human.Mente - Journal of Philosophical Studies 21
          • .
          Publication Description

          In Philosophy and the Scientific Image of Man (1963) Wilfrid Sellars raises a problem for the very possibility of normative epistemology. How can the scientific image, which celebrates the causal relation among often imperceptible physical states, make room for justificatory relations among introspectible propositional attitudes? We sketch a naturalistic model of reason and of epistemic decisions that parallels a compatibilist solution to the problem of freedom of action. Not only doesn’t science lead to rejection of our account of normative reasoning, science depends on, sophisticates, and explains how normative reasoning is possible.

          • O. Flanagan Jr. & A. Ancell, S. Martin, G. Steenbergen.
          • 2012.
          • What do the Psychology and Biology of Morality have to do with Ethics?: Ethics as Human Ecology.
          • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2011.
          • HAN FEI ZI’S PHILOSOPHICAL PSYCHOLOGY: HUMAN NATURE, SCARCITY, AND THE NEO- DARWINIAN CONSENSUS with Jing Hu.
          • Journal of Chinese Philosophy
          • 38:
          • 293-316
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2011.
          • Wittgenstein's Ethical Nonnaturalism: An Interpretation of Tractatus 6.41-47 and the "Lecture on Ethics".
          • American Philosophical Quarterly
          • 48:
          • 185-198
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2011.
          • My Non-Narrative, Non-Forensic Dasein: The First and Second Self.
          • 214-240
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2011.
          • Phenomenal and Historical Selves.
          • Grazer Philosophische Studien, special issue on "Facets of self-consciousness"
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2011.
          • Performing Oneself.
          • .
          Publication Description

          Abstract: I explore the ancient idea that life is some kind of dramatic or artistic performance. How seriously and literally ought we to take this idea that life is like a dramatic performance, even that it is one? There are metaphysical and logical questions about whether and how self-creation and self-constitution are possible; and there are normative questions about which norms sensibly govern self-constituting performances. Here I discuss the normative questions associated with the ideas that life is a performance and that the self is something that both emerges in and is constituted by the performance. Three contemporary psychopoetic conceptions of persons – “day-by-day persons,” “ironic persons,” and “strong poetic persons” are examined in order to discuss whether there are legitimate normative constraints on “performing oneself,” and, if so, what these might be.

          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2010.
          • 1. “What does the Modularity of Ethics have to do with Ethics? Four Moral Sprouts Plus or Minus a Few” with Robert A. Williams, TopiCS (Topics in Cognitive Science)..
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2010.
          • Neuroexistentialism, with David Barack.
          • EURAMERICA
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2010.
          • What is it Like to be an Addict?.
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2009.
          • One Enchanted Being: Neuroexistentialism and Meaning.
          • Zygon Journal of Religion and Science
          • 44:
          • 41-50
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2009.
          • “Neuro-Eudaimonics, or Buddhists Lead Neuroscientists to the Seat of Happiness”.
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2009.
          • “Emotional Expressions: Why Moralists Scowl, Frown, and Smile.
          • 413-434
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2009.
          • “Five Questions”.
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2009.
          • “Buddhist Persons & EudaimoniaBuddha”.
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2009.
          • “The Structures of Meaningful Life Stories”.
          • Argentinian Journal of Philosophy and Psychology
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2009.
          • “Moral Science? Still Metaphysical After All These Years”.
          • 52-78
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2009.
          • "Can Do Attitudes": Some Positive Illusions are not Misbeliefs.
          • BBS
          • .
          Publication Description

          Comment on McKay & Dennett

          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2008.
          • 2. “The Neural Pathway to the White House”.
          • The New Scientist
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2008.
          • 1. “MORAL CONTAGION AND LOGICAL PERSUASION IN THE MOZI”.
          • Journal of Chinese Philosophy
          • 473-491
          • .
          • O. Flanagan, H. Sarkissian, and D. Wong.
          • 2007.
          • Naturalizing Ethics.
          • 1:
          • 1-26
          • .
          • O. Flanagan, H. Sarkissian, and D. Wong.
          • 2007.
          • "What is the Nature of Morality? A Response to Casebeer, Railton, and Ruse".
          • 1:
          • 45-52
          • .
          • O. Flanagan.
          • 2006.
          • “The Bodhisattva’s Brain: Neuroscience and Happiness” in.
          • .
          • O. Flanagan.
          • 2006.
          • Varieties of Naturalism.
          • .
          • Ruth Faden, O. Flanagan et al..
          • 2005.
          • 1. Moral Issues of Human-Non-Human Primate Neural Grafting, ..
          • Science 15 July 2005: Vol. 309. no. 5733, pp. 385 – 386
          • .
          • O. Flanagan.
          • 2003.
          • "The Neurobiology of Sexual Self-Consciousness: Mind and the Interplay of Brain and Body".
          • .
          Publication Description

          Chapter on Narrative Self-Construction by individuals w/non-standard sexual identities.

          • O. Flanagan.
          • 2003.
          • Emotional Expressions.
          • .
          • Thomas Polger and Owen Flanagan.
          • 2001.
          • "Natural Questions to Natural Answers".
          • 5:
          • .
          • Thomas Polger and Owen Flanagan.
          • 2001.
          • "Is Consciousness an Adaptation?".
          • .
          • Owen Flanagan and Donald Dryden.
          • 1997.
          • "Consciousness and the Mind".
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1997.
          • "Consciousness as a Pragmatist Views It".
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1997.
          • "How to Study Consciousness Empirically: The Case of Dreams".
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr. with Guven Guzeldere.
          • 1997.
          • "Consciousness: A Philosophical Tour".
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1997.
          • "Moral Confidence: Three Cheers for Naturalistic Ethics".
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1996.
          • "Prospects For A Unified Theory of Consciousness or, What Dreams are Made Of".
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1996.
          • Neurowissenschaft und Traume: Mentale Zustande und der Ausdruck der eigenen Personlichkeit im Schlaf, BewuBtsein: Beitrage aus der Gegenwartsphilosophie.
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1996.
          • "Moral Network".
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr. with Thomas Polger.
          • 1996.
          • "Zombies and the Function of Consciousness".
          • The Journal of Consciousness Studies
          • 2:
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1996.
          • "Ethics Naturalized: Ethics and Human Ecology".
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1995.
          • "Deconstructing Dreams: The Spandrels of Sleep".
          • The Journal of Philosophy
          • 5-27
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1995.
          • "The Moment of Truth on the Dublin Bridge".
          • South Atlantic Quarterly
          • 94:
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1995.
          • "Consciousness and Natural Method".
          • Neuropsychologia
          • 33:
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1995.
          • "Consciousness".
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1995.
          • "History of the Philosophy of Mind".
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1995.
          • "Stream of Consciousness".
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1995.
          • "D. C. Dennett".
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1995.
          • "Behaviorism".
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1995.
          • "Multiple Identity, Character Transformation, and Self-Reclamation".
          • 135 - 162
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1993.
          • "Situations and Dispositions".
          • 681-695
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1992.
          • "Other Minds, Obligation, and Honesty".
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1991.
          • "Identity, Gender, and Strong Evaluation".
          • Nous
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1990.
          • "Virtue and Ignorance".
          • The Journal of Philosophy
          • LXXXVII:
          • 420-428
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1990.
          • "Identity and Strong and Weak Evaluation".
          • 37-65
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1988.
          • "Pragmatism, Ethics, and Correspondence Truth: Response to Gibson and Quine".
          • Ethics
          • 541-549
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr. with Kathryn Jackson.
          • 1987.
          • "Justice, Care, and Gender: The Kohlberg-Gilligan Debate Revisited".
          • Ethics
          • 622-637
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1986.
          • "Psychoanalysis and Social Practice: A Comment on Grünbaum".
          • The Behavioral and Brain Sciences
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1986.
          • "Admirable Immorality and Admirable Imperfection".
          • The Journal of Philosophy
          • 41-60
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr. with Jonathan Adler.
          • 1983.
          • "Impartiality and Particularity".
          • Social Research
          • 576-596
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1982.
          • "Quinean Ethics".
          • Ethics
          • 56-74
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1982.
          • "Moral Structures?".
          • Philosophy of the Social Sciences
          • 255-270
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1982.
          • "A Reply to Lawrence Kohlberg".
          • Ethics
          • 529-532
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1982.
          • "Virtue, Sex, and Gender: Some Philosophical Reflections on the Moral Psychology Debate".
          • Ethics
          • 499-512
          • .
      • Papers Published

          • O. Flanagan.
          • 2014.
          • Phenomenal Authority: The Epistemic Authority of Alcoholics Anonymous.
          • .
          Publication Description

          To understand a complicated psycho-bio-social phenomenon(a) such as addiction to alcohol one wants ideally a phenomenology, a behavioral and cognitive psychology, a physiology, and a neurobiology -- all embedded in a sociology. One wants to know what it is like to be alcoholic – if, that is, there is any commonality to the experiences of alcoholics (Flanagan 2011). One wants to know about such things as whether and if so what kind of loss of control alcoholics experience in relation to alcohol (as well as, any and all affective and cognitive deficits). One wants to know what the brain is doing and how it contributes to the production of the characteristic phenomenology(ies) and control (and other cognitive and affective) problems. One wants to know what effect heavy drinking has on vulnerable organ systems, e.g., the brain, the heart, and the liver. And, of course, all along the way, one should want to know how the sociomoral-cultural-political ecology normalizes, romanticizes, pathologizes, etc. alcoholism and its relations, heavy drinking, recklessness-under-the-influence, etc. Some scientists and philosophers worry that the program of A.A. biases our understanding of the phenomenology, psychology, physiology, and neurobiology of addiction and prevents a unified, or at least a consilient, account of the nature, causes, and treatment of alcoholism from emerging. I have experience in the rooms of A.A., as well as in seminar and conference rooms with experts on addiction. From this perspective, I assess this claim that A.A. is part of the problem, not of the solution, and suggest some ways to increase mutual understanding between the various modes of understanding alcoholism, which if abided would yield sensitive and sensible interaction among the practical program of A.A. and the sciences of addiction. One consequence is that A.A. would need to acknowledge that as a therapeutic social institution it is a repository of some practical knowledge about what works to help some people recovery and stay abstinent, but has no expertise on alcoholism or even on “how it works” if, that is, it does work.

          • O. Flanagan & Jing Hu.
          • 2014.
          • Han Fei Zi's Philosophical Psychology: Human Nature, Scarcity, and the Neo-Darwinian Consensus.
          • .
          • O. Flanagan.
          • 2014.
          • PERFORMING ONESELF.
          • .
          • O. Flanagan.
          • 2013.
          • The Shame of Addiction.
          • FRONTIERS IN PSYCHIATRY
          • .
          Publication Description

          http://www.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fpsyt.2013.00120/abstract

          Referred Article. Open Source Journal. 720 Views in 3 months.

      • Books

          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2014.
          • MORAL SPROUTS AND NATURAL TELEOLOGIES 21st CENTURY MORAL PSYCHOLOGY MEETS CLASSICAL CHINESE PHILOSOPHY.
          • Marquette University Press.
          • Abrol Fairweather & O. Flanagan Jr. (Eds.).
          • 2013.
          • Naturalized Virtue Epistemology.
          • Cambridge University Press.
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2011.
          • The Bodhisattva's Brain: Buddhism Naturalized (paper 2013).
          • MIT PRESS.
          • O. Flanagan.
          • 2007.
          • The Really Hard Problem: Meaning in a Material World.
          • MIT Press.
          Publication Description

          Nominated for a Pulitzer in Best Academic Book Category. Published Nov. 1. In 2nd Printing

          • O. Flanagan.
          • 2003.
          • Almas Que Suenan.
          • Oceano.
          Publication Description

          Spanish translation of DREAMING SOULS.

          • O. Flanagan.
          • 2003.
          • The Problem of the Soul.
          • Basic Books.
          • O. Flanagan.
          • 2003.
          • The Problem of the Soul: Two Visions of Mind and How to Reconcile Them.
          • Basic Books.
          • 2003.
          • Narrative and Consciousness: Literature, Psychology, and the Brain. Eds. Gary Fireman, Ted McVay, and Owen Flanagan.
          • Oxford University Press.
          Publication Description

          Interdisciplinary book (edited collection) on role/construction of self-narratives in cog. sci, neuroscience, psychology and literature. A contribution to topic of personal identity and role of narrative in self-construction.

          First book of its kind, largely inspired by previous work of mine on the narrative self. Co-author of Introduction and of one essay with Gillian Einstein (see elsewhere)

          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1999.
          • Dreaming Souls.
          • Oxford University Press.
          • 1998.
          • The Nature of Consciousness.
          • MIT Press.
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1996.
          • Self Expressions: Mind, Morals and the Meaning of Life.
          • Oxford University Press.
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1992.
          • Consciousness Reconsidered.
          • MIT Press.
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1991.
          • Varieties of Moral Personality: Ethics and Psychological Realism.
          • Harvard University Press.
          • 1990.
          • Identity, Character, and Morality: Essays in Moral Psychology.
          • MIT Press.
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 1984.
          • The Science of the Mind.
          • MIT Press.
      • Papers Accepted

          • O. Flanagan.
          • 2014.
          • *It Takes a Metaphysics, Raising Virtuous Buddhists*.
          • .
          Publication Description

          Abstract: Buddhism is an extremely demanding ethic, possibly as demanding as act-utilitarianism. It endorses virtuous dispositions, compassion and loving-kindness, to alleviate the suffering of all sentient beings and to bring well-being in its stead. How does Buddhism inculcate these virtues, if it does? Besides the usual direct instruction, cajoling, carrots and sticks familiar across ethical traditions, Buddhists work to inculcate these virtues by teaching children a metaphysic that involves recognition of one’s ephemerality and one’s dependency on and interconnectedness with all other beings.

          • O. Flanagan.
          • 2013.
          • Introduction.
          • .
          • O. Flanagan, Aaron Ancell, Stephen Martin, Gordon Steenbergen.
          • 2013.
          • Empiricism and Normative Ethics What do the biology and the psychology of morality have to do with ethics?.
          • Behavior
          • .
          • O. Flanagan.
          • 2013.
          • Buddhism and The Scientific Image.
          • Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science
          • .
          • O. Flanagan & S. Geisz.
          • 2013.
          • Confucian Moral Sources.
          • .
      • Book Reviews

          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2012.
          • Kristján Kristjánsson The Self and Its Emotions Kristján Kristjánsson, The Self and Its Emotions, Cambridge University Press, 2010, 288pp., ISBN 9780521114783..
          • NOTRE DAME PHILOSOPHICAL REVIEWS
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2011.
          • SISSELA BOK Exploring Happiness: From Aristotle to Brain Science.
          • Notre Dame Review of Books
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2010.
          • I, Hypocrite.
          • New Scientist
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2010.
          • Damasio's Debacle.
          • NATURE
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2009.
          • The Ego Tunnel http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20127001.600-review-the-ego-tunnel-by-thomas-metzinger.html.
          • New Scientist
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2009.
          • Where in the World is the Mind?http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20126911.800-review-where-in-the-world-is-the-mind.html.
          • New Scientist
          • 201:
          • 42-43
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2009.
          • “The Literate Ape,” New Scientist November 23, 2009 http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/culturelab/2009/11/how-our-brains-learned-to-read.php.
          • .
          • O. Flanagan Jr..
          • 2009.
          • “The Left Brain Conspiracy,” New Scientist, December 9, 2009 http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20427381.600.
          • .

      

  • brain scan