Various Social Developmental Neuroscience Fellowship Opportunities @ Emory University

The Marcus Autism Center, in conjunction with the Emory University School of Medicine and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, is offering various opportunities:

The Donald J. Cohen Fellowship 

The Donald J. Cohen Fellowship in Developmental Social Neuroscience provides recent college graduates with the opportunity to spend two years engaged in state-of-the-art clinical and basic research with children and families affected by autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Cohen Fellows are directly mentored by the program directors and are involved in a highly active and productive community of clinical research scientists who study ASD. Previous Cohen Fellows have led a wide range of research projects and have gone on to PhD, MD, and MD/PhD programs in specialties such as clinical, developmental, and basic science.

Cohen Fellows guide a research project from the point of data collection through analysis and publication of results. Over the course of two years, fellows gain in-depth research and clinical experience through work with infants, toddlers, and school-age children spanning the full autism spectrum. Fellows also complete an intensive summer training seminar covering clinical research in ASD (one week), ASD grand rounds meetings (twice a month), social neuroscience lab meetings (weekly), training tutorials in relevant statistical softwares, and ongoing didactic practica.

Donald J. Cohen (1940-2001) was a nationally and internationally renowned child psychiatrist who positively impacted the lives of children and families all over the world. More information about his life and work can be found here.

Simons Fellowship

The Simons Fellowship in Computational Neuroscience provides recent college graduates with the opportunity to spend two years using computer programming and basic science to advance our understanding of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Simons Fellows are directly mentored by the program directors and are involved in a highly active and productive community of clinicians, scientists, and engineers who study ASD. Previous Simons Fellows have led a wide range of research projects and have gone on to PhD, MD, and MD/PhD programs as well as to research positions in computer and software engineering.

Over the course of two years, Simons Fellows work to integrate computational strategies with clinical research goals, guiding a research project from data collection through analysis and publication of results. Fellows work on: developing methods for analyzing visual scanning and eye-tracking data, computational models of visual salience, and data visualization techniques, all with the aim of advancing understanding of ASD and efforts at early diagnosis. Fellows also complete a training curriculum through their participation in an intensive summer training seminar covering clinical research in ASD (one week), ASD grand rounds meetings (twice a month), social neuroscience lab meetings (weekly), training tutorials in relevant statistical softwares, and ongoing didactic practica.

Marcus Fellowship

The Marcus Fellowship in Speech Science and Engineering is a two-year predoctoral research fellowship designed to prepare graduate-level engineers and linguists for entry into a doctoral degree, leading either to an academic career in speech science and engineering, or to a clinical career in speech-language pathology and communication disorders.

The main focus of the training program is early vocal development in the first years of life in children at risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), as part of a broader interdisciplinary research program mapping out the development and derailment of spoken communication in early childhood.

Education Sciences Fellowship

The Education Sciences Fellowship provides recent college graduates with the opportunity to spend two years engaged in research investigating educational innovations in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), from early childhood through high school. Educational services are the only universal, federally mandated services available to individuals with ASD who are age 3 or older. Yet, little is currently known about the nature of effective components of classroom-based interventions, measurement of teacher implementation and student learning, and implementation of educational innovations in community settings.

Fellows are directly mentored by program directors and involved in a highly active and productive community of clinical/educational research scientists who study ASD. This fellowship aims to serve as a stepping stone for doctoral programs in education, speech- language pathology or developmental/clinical psychology.

Clinical Research Fellowship

The Clinical Research Fellowship provides recent college graduates with the opportunity to spend two years engaged in cutting-edge clinical research and to learn various assessment measures commonly used for clinical and diagnostic characterization of autism and related disabilities. Clinical fellows will learn assessments across a variety of domains including cognitive/development, social-behavioral, language, and adaptive functioning. Additionally, they will learn to interpret the commonly used instruments as well as writing up the results for families into a clinical report.

Fellows are directly mentored by clinicians and program directors and involved in a highly active and productive community of interdisciplinary research scientists who study ASD. This fellowship aims to serve as a stepping stone for doctoral programs in clinical psychology and PsyD or MD programs.

Implementation Science Fellowship 

The Implementation Science Fellowship provides recent college graduates with the opportunity to spend two years engaged in innovative translational research and to learn about the methods used within implementation science to examine the adoption, implementation and sustainment of evidence-based practices within a variety of community systems, including early intervention and public school systems.

Implementation Science Fellows will also learn about common evidence-based practices for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and how these interventions are implemented and adapted across settings in order to meet the needs of caregivers, providers and healthcare systems. This will include learning how community-partnered, mixed-methods and qualitative research can be used to leverage the voice of autistic individuals, families and community stakeholders in implementation processes.

Further details are available on the Center's website.

Program Directors: Cheryl Klaiman, PhD; Ami Klin, PhD; Warren Jones, PhD; Katherine Pickard, PhD; Gordon Ramsay, PhD; Sarah Shultz, PhD; Lindee Morgan, PhD, CCC-SLP; and Michael Siller, PhD

Term of all awards: Two years

Submission deadline for all awards: Jan. 7, 2022

Award amount (for all): $34,000 annually

All applications must be submitted electronically.

To complete your online application, you will need a resume or curriculum vitae, a statement of purpose, two letters of recommendation and a scanned transcript(s). Visit marcus.org/fellowship or call 404-785-9554 for application materials and additional information.

Type
  • Paid job
Timeframe
  • Post-graduation