Grainne Fitzsimons

Grainne Fitzsimons

Professor of Business Adminstration

Education & Training

  • Ph.D., New York University 2004

  • M.A., New York University 2002

  • B.A., McGill University (Canada) 1999

Overview

Gráinne M. Fitzsimons is an associate professor of Management at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and an associate professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University. Professor Fitzsimons received her Ph.D. in Psychology from New York University in 2004, and was on the faculty in the Marketing area at the Stanford Graduate School of Business and the Psychology faculty of the University of Waterloo in Canada, where she held a Canada Research Chair, before joining Fuqua in 2010.

Her research expertise is in the psychology of human social behavior, especially in selfregulation and interpersonal relationships. Her work has been published in numerous top academic journals such as the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology and Psychological Science. Her research has also been discussed in many popular press outlets such as NPR, CNN, MSNBC, the New York Times, and Wall Street Journal.

Professor Fitzsimons received two early career awards: The Caryl E. Rusbult Young Investigator Award, from the Relationship Researchers Interest Group, for her early contribution to the field of interpersonal relationships, and the SAGE Young Scholar Award, from the Foundation for Personality and Social Psychology, for her early contribution to the broader field of social psychology.

At Fuqua, Dr. Fitzsimons teaches the core Daytime MBA course in Leadership, Ethics, and Organizations, and an advanced elective course in Negotiations.

Expertise

Organizational behavior, social cognition, interpersonal relationships, self regulation, motivation, negotiation

Briskin, J. L., et al. “For Better or for Worse? Outsourcing Self-Regulation and Goal Pursuit.” Social Psychological and Personality Science, vol. 10, no. 2, Mar. 2019, pp. 181–92. Scopus, doi:10.1177/1948550617736112. Full Text

Kim, Jae Yun, et al. “Lean in messages increase attributions of women's responsibility for gender inequality..” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, vol. 115, no. 6, Dec. 2018, pp. 974–1001. Epmc, doi:10.1037/pspa0000129. Full Text

Fitzsimons, G. M., and E. J. Finkel. “Transactive-Goal-Dynamics Theory: A Discipline-Wide Perspective.” Current Directions in Psychological Science, vol. 27, no. 5, Oct. 2018, pp. 332–38. Scopus, doi:10.1177/0963721417754199. Full Text

Brick, D. J., et al. “Coke vs. Pepsi: Brand compatibility, relationship power, and life satisfaction.” Journal of Consumer Research, vol. 44, no. 5, Feb. 2018, pp. 991–1014. Scopus, doi:10.1093/jcr/ucx079. Full Text

Brick, D. J., et al. “Erratum: Coke vs. Pepsi: Brand compatibility, relationship power, and life satisfaction [Journal of Consumer Research, 44, 5, (2018) (991-1014)] DOI: 10.1093/jcr/ucx079.” Journal of Consumer Research, vol. 44, no. 5, Feb. 2018. Scopus, doi:10.1093/jcr/ucx095. Full Text

Green, P. I., et al. “The energizing nature of work engagement: Toward a new need-based theory of work motivation.” Research in Organizational Behavior, vol. 37, Jan. 2017, pp. 1–18. Scopus, doi:10.1016/j.riob.2017.10.007. Full Text

Shea, C. T., and G. M. Fitzsimons. “Personal goal pursuit as an antecedent to social network structure.” Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, vol. 137, Nov. 2016, pp. 45–57. Scopus, doi:10.1016/j.obhdp.2016.07.002. Full Text

Laurin, Kristin, et al. “Power and the pursuit of a partner's goals..” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, vol. 110, no. 6, June 2016, pp. 840–68. Epmc, doi:10.1037/pspi0000048. Full Text

Fitzsimons, G. M., et al. “Transactive Goal Dynamics Theory: A relational goals perspective on work teams and leadership.” Research in Organizational Behavior, vol. 36, Jan. 2016, pp. 135–55. Scopus, doi:10.1016/j.riob.2016.11.006. Full Text

Fitzsimons, Gráinne M., et al. “Transactive goal dynamics..” Psychological Review, vol. 122, no. 4, Oct. 2015, pp. 648–73. Epmc, doi:10.1037/a0039654. Full Text

Pages

Cavallo, J. V., and G. M. Fitzsimons. “Goal competition, conflict, coordination, and completion how intergoal dynamics affect self-regulation.” Taylor and Francis Ltd 5, vol. 9780203869666, 2012, pp. 267–300. Scopus, doi:10.4324/9780203869666. Full Text

Fitzsimons, G., and E. J. Finkel. “Outsourcing effort to close others.” The 12th Ontario Symposium: The Science of the Couple, edited by L. Campbell et al., Psychology Press, 2012, pp. 41–57.

Fitzsimons, G. M., et al. “Progress-Induced goal shifting as a self-regulatory strategy.” Psychology of Self-Regulation: Cognitive, Affective, and Motivational Processes, 2011, pp. 183–97. Scopus, doi:10.4324/9780203837962. Full Text

Fitzsimons, G., and J. E. Anderson. “Interdependent goals and relationship conflict.” The Psychology of Social Conflict and Aggression, edited by J. P. Forgas et al., Psychology Press, 2011, pp. 185–200.

Fitzsimons, G., and J. C. Cavallo. “Inter-Goal Dynamics.” Goal-Directed Behavior, edited by H. Aarts and A. J. Elliot, Psychology Press/Taylor and Frances, 2011, pp. 269–301.

Fitzsimons, G., and E. J. Finkel. “The effects of self-regulation on social relationships.” Handbook of Self-Regulation: Research, Theory, and Applications, edited by K. D. Vohs and R. F. Bauermeister, Guilford, 2011, pp. 407–21.

Fitzsimons, G. M., and J. E. Anderson. “Interdependent goals and relationship conflict.” The Psychology of Social Conflict and Aggression, 2011, pp. 185–99. Scopus, doi:10.4324/9780203803813. Full Text

Fitzsimons, G. “Goal influences in relationship.” Encyclopedia of Human Relationships, edited by H. Reis and S. Sprecher, Sage, 2009.

Fitzsimons, G., et al. “Progress-induced goal-shifting.” Self-Regulation: Cognitive, Affective, and Motivational Processes, edited by J. P. Forgas et al., Psychology Press, 2009, pp. 181–94.

Fitzsimons, G., et al. “Automaticity in interpersonal relationships.” Social Psychology and the Unconscious: The Automaticity of Higher Mental Processes, edited by J. A. Bargh, Psychology Press, 2007, pp. 133–72.

Pages